Current Fellows

Lyndsey Miller, PhD, RN

Lyndsey Miller, PhD, RN

Research Focus: Improving the care planning process for persons with dementia and their family caregivers through tailored dyadic interventions

Dr. Miller's ongoing research program, beginning with her dissertation study [F31NR015195] of hospitalized persons with dementia and their family caregivers, is to use dyadic methods and theory to examine and improve the way that persons with dementia plan for future care together with their family caregivers.  Dr. Miller's postdoctoral fellowship research will include several analyses aimed at uncovering the heterogeneous patterns of decision making and care planning among families with dementia, which will lead to the design of a pilot intervention tailored to distinct subgroups of dementia care dyads.  The ultimate goals of this line of research are to: 1) assist persons with dementia in participating in their own care planning to the fullest extent possible; 2) assist family caregivers in their transition to surrogate decision-making; 3) support the dementia care dyad as a unit so that they are able to find a new balance between their relationship and their individual needs as they plan together for future care.

Faculty Advisor:  Michael Caserta, PhD

Amy R. Newman, PhD, RN, CPNP-PC, CPHPN

Amy R. Newman, PhD, RN, CPNP-PC, CPHPN

Research Focus: Improving communication of diagnostic and prognostic information to pediatric patients with cancer and their families through interdisciplinary methods

Program of Research: Through her clinical work, Dr. Newman identified the unique challenges and both positive and negative outcomes associated with diagnostic and prognostic-related communication with pediatric patients with cancer and their parents. Her dissertation work explored the experiences of pediatric oncology nurses within this context, which highlighted the need for additional training and education for nurses as well as better collaboration with physician colleagues. Armed with this knowledge and previous work examining physician and parent perspectives, Dr. Newman aims to develop interdisciplinary communication interventions to improve the process of communication among the patient, parent and providers. The goals of this line of research are to: 1) increase nurse-physician collaboration when providing diagnostic and prognostic information; 2) improve the delivery of diagnostic and prognostic information to patients and their family members to enhance decision making, hopefulness and quality of life; and 3) explore the impact of early integration of palliative care principles into diagnostic and prognostic discussions.

Faculty Advisor: Lauri Linder, PhD, APRN, CPON