Our Members

Lee Ellington

Lee Ellington

Title:  Principle Investigator

Lee Ellington is a Professor at the College of Nursing, a clinical psychologist, and a Huntsman Cancer Institute Investigator. She holds the Robert S. and Beth M. Carter Endowed Chair. She has an interdisciplinary program of research in family-patient-provider communication. Her primary interest is in meeting the health and well-being needs of family caregivers of advance cancer patients through communication processes. As the Principal Investigator of the research team, she is responsible for all aspects of the Hospice Today Project. Lee enjoys binge watching British mysteries, running, walking, and is always working on a 1000 piece jigsaw puzzle.
Kristin Cloyes

Kristin Cloyes

Title:  Co-Investigator

Kristin Cloyes is an Associate Professor at the College of Nursing, Assistant Dean of the PhD Program, and is an nurse with advanced training in mental health and gerontology. Her research focuses on chronic illness and caregiving within communities that are underserved within health care systems and under-represented in health research. In 2018 she was recognized with a University of Utah Distinguished Teaching Award. She is a Co-Investigator on the Hospice Today Project, and is leading the part of the Project focused on LGBTQ+ caregivers. Kristin self-identifies as a geek, and is always  making something with yarn, wood, fabric, plants or food.

Anna Beck

Anna Beck

Anna Beck, MD has been a hospice medical director for 13 years. She is board certified in Hospice and Palliative Medicine, directs the Supportive Oncology & Survivorship program at Huntsman Cancer Institute. She is passionate about improving end of life care for patients, as well as supporting those who care for loved ones at end of life.

 

Gary Donaldson

Gary Donaldson

Gary Donaldson's research concerns better ways to measure pain, to understand its causes, and to represent the vast variation in individual responses to objectively similar painful situations. One particular focus has been the development of pain measurement approaches that encourage natural description of the pain experience without reference to arbitrary numbers. Clinically Aligned Pain Assessment (CAPA) is now used as the primary pain assessment in the University of Utah Hospital.  The Visual Time Analog is a parallel measurement developed for research application. The complex multidimensional construct of pain is difficult to study without an overarching methodological perspective. New developments in statistical and causal modeling have been critical for these investigations, and many of my publications are either applications of these methods or didactic illustrations of the new methods. He and his colleagues believe that integrated methods, theory, and clinical understanding should inform design and interpretation of our studies.  In addition to his work as Director of the Pain Research Center, he is Senior Strategic Statistician for the College of Nursing at the University of Utah, and is an affiliate Member of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, where he maintain an active program in Quality of Life research.
Kathi Mooney

Kathi Mooney

Kathi Mooney is a Distinguished Professor at the University of Utah College of Nursing and Co-leads the Cancer Control and Population Sciences Program at the Huntsman Cancer Institute. Her research interests include cancer symptom management, technology-aided interventions, outcomes of supportive care, and cancer family caregivers. She has published numerous book chapters and journal articles and is a frequent speaker on topics related to cancer symptom management, quality cancer care, improving clinical outcomes, tecnology-aided interventions/telehealth, and creativity and innovation in science.
Christina Echeverria

Christina Echeverria

Christina has been a member of Dr. Mooney’s research team since 2002. Currently she is the research manager for Dr. Mooney and is involved in all of her clinical research projects which are focused on symptom management for cancer patients receiving chemotherapy extending to hospice care for cancer patients and their family caregivers. Prior to working with Dr. Mooney’s clinical research program, Christina worked as the coordinator of Dr. Mooney’s federally funded training grant from 2002 -2008. The training grant developed a PhD program, for oncology nurses, which was delivered to students all over the country using IP videoconferencing. Christina received her Bachelor of Science degree in Sociology from the University of Utah in 1993 and her Master of Arts degree in Counseling and Educational Psychology from the University of Nevada, Reno in 1998.
Maija Reblin

Maija Reblin

Dr. Maija Reblin is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Outcomes & Behavior at Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida. She received her PhD in social psychology from the University of Utah and her research focuses on understanding how relationships and communication can help coping in family caregivers and patients with advanced cancer. Maija is a runner, rower, and dog enthusiast. She is excited for the Hospice Today study to learn more about what makes hospice work and how to make it better from families across the country.
Eli Iacobs

Eli Iacobs

Eli Iacob is a Research Associate part of the statistical core at the College of Nursing. His previous research work has focused on depression and pain in clinical populations. As a team member for the Hospice Today Project, he has helped to design the REDCap database that manages participant recruitment, visit tracking, and patient reported outcomes. He will also be involved with data analysis and dissemination at study completion. He is excited about the progress the project will make in understanding nurse-caregiver dyadic relationships in the face of cancer. When not working, he will be found spending time with his two sons and wife climbing, hiking, biking, playgrounds, and in various museums.
Djin Tay

Djin Tay

Djin Tay is a PhD Candidate at the College of Nursing with an interest in patient and caregiver collaboration and communication in decision making during serious illness. Her dissertation work pilot tests a theory-based intervention to encourage older adult home health patient and caregiver dyads’ collaboration in advance care planning. She is experienced in observational coding, statistical and qualitative methodology, and study coordination from her academic preparation and work training since 2009 as a research assistant. She also brings her perspective from the field of home health nursing. In her free time, Djin enjoys hiking, baking, crafting, and gardening with her three boys.

 

Email:  Djin.Tay@utah.edu

William Hull

William Hull

William Hull is a PhD student with interest in family caregiver's perspectives and experience with healthcare, particularly, in conjunction with stressful circumstance (i.e. end-of-life communication, hospice, minority status). As a team member he provides valuable insights from a clinical nurse perspective, contributing to the overall project design, including: analysis, recruitment, and code book development. When he isn’t working with the Hospice Today Project you might find him listening to music (live or otherwise), camping, hiking, brewing beer, traveling, and/or eating delicious food.
Sarah Wawrzynski

Sarah Wawrzynski

Sarah Wawrzynski is a registered nurse with over 15 years of bedside nursing experience. She also and 3rd year PhD student with an interest in caregiving and family dynamics within the context of cancer. In her free time, she enjoys running, travel, and pretty much anything outside.

Contact Us
Hospice Care Today Project

Phone: 801-587-5368
Email: hospicetodayproject@utah.edu

10 South 2000 East
Salt Lake City, UT 84112

*If this is an emergency, call 911 or your hospice care provider